I want to enjoy The Titans, I really do. There is definitely tortured-superhero character development to enjoy—especially in the first season, which when defined as it should have been by Rachel’s deliciously creepy arc, includes the first episode of the second season. Yet the writers keep making one particularly questionable decision over and over. Usually, when a TV story follows characters in different settings, or in different time frames (past and present), these dual story threads are interwoven within episodes. And have you heard the cliché, You have to understand the rule before you can break it? The writers are certainly making a conscious choice not to flip back-and-forth, but instead to devote entire episodes to the secondary storyline. This structure can work…but only if the writers were still addressing the purpose of the usual rule: Leave them wanting more.

Knowing when to leave

A good time to leave a storyline is when the characters are on the brink of something exciting—victory, disaster, anything the viewers are dying to see. This makes the viewers (or readers, because the same principle works for chapter breaks) anxious to get back to the other storyline. The Titans continually leaves the secondary storyline after a moment of resolution, an ending point so neatly tied in a bow I kept thinking the secondary arc was finished when there were actually more episodes to come! So, of course, I wasn’t in suspense, anxiously awaiting the next installment.

What’s next on my watchlist

Suddenly, there’s so much spec fic to watch: new (to me) seasons of The Handmaid’s Tale, The Witcher, Star Trek: Discovery, The Wheel of Time, possibly Locke and Key. What’s on your list?